Art & Exhibitions

All Articles

‘Giacometti’ at the Tate Modern: Look at the Eyes

The Tate Modern has dedicated their latest exhibition to one of the most iconic painter-sculptors of the twentieth century. Alberto Giacometti’s (1901-1966) unique depictions of the human body have influenced decades of art, and this Tate exhibition is the first large-scale retrospective of the artist in the UK for over twenty years. Giacometti traces the artist’s career across five decades and manages to be both visually stimulating and intensely thought-provoking. Growing up in rural Switzerland Giacometti was the eldest child of...

read more

Giovanni da Rimini on Facebook Live

On Thursday 29th June, 6pm (BST) The National Gallery will be hosting a Facebook Live exhibition tour of Giovanni da Rimini: A 14th-Century Masterpiece Unveiled.[1] The tour will provide an exclusive glimpse of the reunion of “Scenes from the Lives of the Virgin and other Saints” (procured by The National Gallery in 2015) and “Scenes from the Life of Christ” (Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Antica, Rome), two halves of a diptych by Giovanni da Rimini. Though often necessary for conservation purposes, it has become common practice for medieval art...

read more

The Enduring Problem of Art Forgery: Confronting Old Issues with New Technology

Conventional wisdom goes that art forgery first emerged in the Renaissance when artists like Michelangelo desperately sought money, fame, and most importantly a place within the art world.[1] During this period, forgers were commended for their flawless imitations as artwork originality was not perceived as a necessity for success. Accordingly, Michelangelo’s attempts to recreate works by other notable sculptors did not end his career, but instead launched it. Known today as one of the most famous artists of the Italian Renaissance, his...

read more

Morality and Taxidermy in Art: Between the Monstrous and the Beautiful

In recent years taxidermy has become popular as an art medium. Artists like Damien Hirst, Polly Morgan, Enrique Gomez de Molina, and Sarina Brewer have started exploring the artistic potentials in the practice of mounting animal skins. Some recent taxidermy art presents itself as Art (with a capital A), busily establishing itself as a serious artistic medium. One example of this direction in is Chinese artist Cai Guo-Qiang’s Head On (2006), where 99 wolves leap through air only to smash into a glass wall. There is no mistaking that for...

read more

Disobedient Bodies at The Hepworth Wakefield

JW Anderson, the fashion designer, has curated the first in a series of collaborations between The Hepworth Wakefield and individuals in other disciplines outside of traditional visual art. Anderson has taken a number of items from The Hepworth’s permanent collection; in this way he has given 1920s sculpture new, very modern interpretations by placing them in relation to clothing from designers such as Christian Dior, Issey Miyake and Jean Paul Gaultier, along with items from craft and design from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries....

read more

Carolee Schneemann’s ‘More Wrong Things’ at the Hales Gallery

Carolee Schneemann’s second solo exhibition at the Hales Gallery is confined yet intensely thought-provoking. Not an exhibition for the faint-hearted, in More Wrong Things, Schneemann explores the brutality of conflict, grief, and the universality of suffering. Bringing together a central video installation, a selection of untitled paintings, and photography, Schneemann explores issues such as the desolation wrought by the invasion of Lebanon in 1982, the collapse of the World Trade Centre in 2001, and other – both worldwide and personal –...

read more

‘You Are Looking at Something That Never Occurred’ at the Zabludowicz Collection

  “Life is not about significant details, illuminated by a flash, fixed forever. Photographs are.” – Susan Sontag.[1]   The current exhibition at the Zabludowicz Collection in London brings together the work of photographic artists spanning the last 40 years to trace “how artists have used the camera to blur boundaries between past and present, fact and fiction”.[2] Housed in a striking Grade II listed former Methodist chapel, Paul Luckraft has carefully curated the work of 14 international artists, drawn exclusively from the personal...

read more

Vuitton and Da Vinci: The Changing Boundaries Between Fashion and Art

While both fashion and art work primarily within the aesthetic world, fashion’s material and commercial nature seems to have discouraged a wider audience from acknowledging it in the same plane as high art. The tide appears to be turning on this opinion in recent years however, and it seems that now is a good time to be asking the question: what relationship does fashion have with art? Last month, Masters, an accessory based collaboration with Louis Vuitton and Jeff Koons, was celebrated with a launch party at the Louvre, arguably the...

read more

Unrealised Ambition: ‘Imagine Moscow: Architecture, Propaganda, Revolution’ at the Design Museum

As a devotee of Soviet art in 2017, one is currently spoiled for choice in a sea of centenary exhibitions dedicated to contextualising the early years of  upheaval that followed the Russian revolution. The Design Museum’s current exhibition, Imagine Moscow: Architecture, Propaganda, Revolution offers a distinct study of architectural utopianism during the initial years of Soviet communism. The compactness of this exhibition relative to, for example, the larger project recently undertaken by the Royal Academy (about which you can read...

read more

Rejecting the High Street: Lydia Higginson’s ‘Made My Wardrobe’

As Yves Saint Laurent once said, “fashion fades, but style is eternal.”[1] In this age of live-streamed shows at London Fashion Week and apps that tell you where your favourite fashionistas shop so you can buy buy buy quick quick quick, this saying feels more appropriate than ever. Fluffy slides and appliqué denim will soon be lining the bins of next year: disposable clothing is firmly en vogue. Yet, amongst all the aforementioned Insta style, I found the anathema to this consumer culture in the form of a blog called Made My Wardrobe. Written...

read more

Mysteries of the Deep: ‘Jean Painlevé’ at the Ikon Gallery

Jean Painlevé, a visionary filmmaker renowned for being one of the first people to begin to capture, and attempt to understand, life in the depths of the world’s oceans through visual images. Active between 1927 and 1978, Painlevé was driven by an abundant fascination with underwater fauna and the ecology of the ocean, his films are an attempt to understand the warped and confusing peculiarities of a world beneath the surface of the waves, but also how this peculiar world shares some similarities with our own. Currently on display in...

read more

‘Revolution: Russian Art 1917 – 1932’ at the Royal Academy

In celebration of the centenary of the October Revolution, in which the Bolsheviks swept to power and ended the autocratic rule of the Tsars overnight, the Royal Academy are hosting Revolution: Russian Art 1917 – 1932. This exhibition presents the variety and vibrancy of early Soviet art across this period ending in 1932, which at first appears a little arbitrary, but in fact has been chose to mirror the centenary of Fifteen Years of Artists of the Russian Soviet Republic, originally exhibited in November 1932 at the State Russian...

read more

The Performance of Culture: Ebony G Patterson, Thomas J Price and Zadie Xa at the Hales Gallery

The current group exhibition at Hales Gallery explores questions of cultural identity: a topic which feels particularly pertinent when considering that the show opened the day following Theresa May’s triggering of Article 50 and the start of the UK’s exit process from the EU. The three artists included – Ebony G Patterson, Thomas J Price and Zadie Xa – meditate on the notion of cultural identity, posing questions that centre around how we form our perceptions of identity in the modern world. Working with a diverse range of visual and...

read more

The Birth of Mass Media: Marcantonio Raimondi and Raphael at the Whitworth

Many of the great paintings of Renaissance Italy were intended to be displayed in their patron’s home, only seen by a few people. The printmaker Marcantonio Raimondi is a little-known figure of the period, but the first UK exhibition of his work, currently displaying at the Whitworth in Manchester, reveals that his rich creative collaboration with Raphael, lasting around a decade between 1510 and 1520, helped sow the seeds of the mass consumption of the same image possible today. Marcantonio’s early engravings, produced at the turn of the...

read more

Beyond the American Gothic: ‘America After the Fall’ at the Royal Academy

The Royal Academy is staging its own early 20th century Cold War this spring with its concurrent hosting of America After the Fall: Painting in the 1930s and Revolution: Russian Art 1917-1932. Upstairs in the Sackler Gallery, above the vivid Revolution roaring downstairs, is a more solemn exhibition exploring an America grappling with its own identity as its rural past meets its industrial future. The 1930s were a turbulent time in the United States’ history and many artists used their art to respond to the rapid social change and economic...

read more

Women in the Art World: Signs of Progress

The Venice Biennale is one of the longest running cultural festivals in the world. Founded in 1895, this year will see the 57th International Art Exhibition here (the seeming miscalculation of years resulting from cancellations during the First and Second World War). Both the representatives of Britain and Scotland[1] are female, but there is a noticeable generational discrepancy between them. The British Pavilion will play host to seventy-two year old Phyllida Barlow, the Scottish representative Rachael Maclean, aged thirty, comes from a...

read more

Lorna Simpson’s ‘Twenty Questions (A Sampler)’: Photography’s Power Dynamics

Lorna Simpson first came to prominence as a conceptual artist in the mid-1980s, after graduating with an MFA from the University of San Diego. During this period, artists were preoccupied with dismantling the established framework of contemporary art practices, in response to shifting modes of perception sparked by postmodernism and the surge of poststructuralist writing. With the deconstruction of existing modes of artistic production came a renewed interest in the narrative device and the potency of text. Artists such as Barbara Kruger and...

read more

Through a Different Lens: ‘Britain as Revealed by International Photographers’ at the Manchester Art Gallery

As the House of Lords challenges the government over EU nationals’ right to remain in the UK after Brexit, a new exhibition at Manchester Art Gallery reminds us that photographers from Europe, the United States, and further afield have been visiting Britain for over eighty years, offering a unique contribution to the nation’s cultural landscape. Some of the earliest photographs in this exhibition, Strange and Familiar: Britain as Revealed by International Photographers, were taken by Henri Cartier-Bresson at George VI’s 1936 coronation....

read more

Modernising Modernism: ‘The Radical Eye: Modernist Photography from the Sir Elton John Collection’ at Tate Modern

In 2003, art historian Eva Forgács wrote critically of the scholarly categorization of an “East-European” modernist art, a descriptor that homogenised the broad diversity of artistic experimentation in countries such as Hungary, Romania, Poland, and Czechoslovakia.[1] During the early twentieth century, Forgács argued, artists did not subscribe to a regionalist consciousness and did not engage in regional discourse. Therefore, to universalise the artistic output of an entire region of Europe, ignoring the cultural differences and ethnic...

read more

An Oasis in the Heart of London: ‘Tropical Hangover’ at Tenderpixel

Curated by Borbála Soós and Stella Sideli, Tenderpixel’s current group exhibition is the sensual delight I had hoped for from a show entitled Tropical Hangover, but it is also intellectually provocative. Swallow, a short film by Turner Prize winning artist Laure Prouvost greets you upon entering the gallery. In an interview with Whitechapel Gallery, Prouvost rather ethereally explained that Swallow “aims to show the taste of the sun”; in it, shots of nymphs submerged in idyllic pools are punctuated with short, sharp intakes of breath....

read more

Vikings in York: The Jorvik Viking Festival

Grab your horned hat – hoards of Vikings are descending on York! Luckily, this time they’re not invading but here to celebrate the last of the Viking kings in York, Eric Bloodaxe, at the 32nd Jorvik Viking Festival. Across half term (20th to 26th February), the centre of York is home to a living history encampment, combat demonstrations and a 10th Century traders market where you can pick up wares from Viking craftsmen around the world. Various lectures and activities by academics from both the University of York and further afield promise to...

read more

A Yorkshireman in London: David Hockney at the Tate Britain

While walking into Tate Britain, my companion commented how much she would like someone to record all the things that children say while walking around art galleries; sure enough, the new Hockney exhibition provided such entertainment. As we walked into a tightly packed first room, a parent was comforting a small crying child who commented, “Daddy, I don’t like it!” Such a strong reaction (aversion) elicited smiles and giggles from the surrounding people, who had been busy intently examining the tensions, humour and exuberant colour of...

read more

! Blessed Be :)) Merry Part :(( But Again ! : Ben Jeans Houghton

The rather lengthy and somewhat obscure title of Ben Jeans Houghton’s first solo UK exhibition, ! Blessed Be :)) Merry Part :(( But Again ! left me unsure what to expect when I went to see it. The exhibition, showing at Space In Between until the 25th of February, functions as an investigation of the occult: exploring correspondences between Alchemy, Magick and Contemporary Art. The word occult, from the Latin occultus, literally translates to “hidden” or “secret”, and in common English usage it denotes something that is not usually seen as...

read more

“Class Consciousness to the Fray!”: El Lissitzky’s Soviet Pavillion at ‘Pressa’

2017 marks the centenary of the two Russian revolutions that irrevocably altered the Russian political system and had broad and lasting impacts on the course of the twentieth century. The anniversary of the toppling of Tsarist autocracy and the institution of communism provides an opportunity to reflect on the vast ramifications the events of 1917 had on Russian culture, and the diverse forms of artistic expression that were born amidst this upheaval. Numerous art exhibitions this year are thus examining these early avant-garde...

read more

Ancient Medium, Contemporary Imagination: Laura Carlin’s Ceramics

The marriage between ceramics and narrative is a timeless one. It is ancient, yet familiar, and profoundly human. Whether painted, carved, or sculpted, stories have been told in clay since antiquity. In her first public exhibition in the UK – running until the 5th of February at the House of Illustration near Kings Cross – Laura Carlin has honoured this tradition with heart-warming sensitivity and childlike joy; it was a privilege to step for a while into a world she has moulded from a unique blend of human history and pure imagination....

read more

Santiago Montoya at the Halcyon Gallery: Surfin USA and The Great Swindle

“People worry about their money problems more than they do death” – Montoya 2016 Just out of the chaotic bubble of Bond Street, the Halcyon Gallery in Mayfair offers a quiet spot for reflection through their phenomenal collections and regular free exhibitions. Fresh from the success of The Beaten Path, their exhibition of Bob Dylan’s latest visual art, the Halcyon’s latest collection showcases the work of Colombian-born contemporary artist Santiago Montoya. The collection merges two separate exhibitions: the first, and most prominent,...

read more

Walhalla: Anselm Kiefer in The White Cube

Source: The White Cube (George Darrell) Walhalla. The name is written above the gallery entrance in the artist’s own looping scrawl. The same scrawl that he uses to etch historical and cultural context and significance onto many of his paintings. In Quaternity, 1973, his text allows three feeble fires on a wooden floor to become the holy trinity. In Der Kyffhäuser, 1981, it turns a dark, dank industrial environment into the final resting place of a Holy Roman Emperor. Now, it is the White Cube Gallery in Bermondsey that has been rendered a...

read more

South Africa: The Art of a Nation

The British Museum’s “South Africa: The Art of a Nation” exhibition is on display until the 26th February and is certainly worth a visit. Curators John Giblin and Chris Spring have created a walking tour through the history of South Africa, using the artworks produced by the nation’s populations, from one hundred thousand years ago to the present day. The result is both aesthetically and intellectually engaging. Visitors to this exhibition will experience a lot of beautiful art, but the curators have been careful not to airbrush the dark...

read more

Pushing Boundaries: Rauschenberg at the Tate Modern

The first comprehensive retrospective of Robert Rauschenberg’s career since his death in 2008 recently opened at the Tate Modern and runs until April 2nd. Encompassing the vast diversity of his artistic legacy, from his early experimentations at Black Mountain College, North Carolina, to his final works reinvestigating the possibilities of photography transfers, the exhibition is a monumental celebration of Rauschenberg’s achievements. Robert Rauschenberg matured as a young artist during the heyday of Abstract Expressionism. Taught by such...

read more

Layers of History: Anselm Kiefer and the New Geological Age

On August 29th 2016, a recommendation was presented to the International Geological Congress that a new epoch of geological time should be officially recognised. This epoch is called the Anthropocene, and it dates from the period in which human activities began to have a significant impact of the geology and ecosystems of our planet. That period is largely agreed by scientists as being some time around the 1950s, and its recognition would signify the end of the previous epoch, the Holocene, which began 11,700 years ago towards the end of the...

read more

It’s A Thumbs Up For London!

If you have passed through Trafalgar Square recently you could not have failed to notice the Square’s most recent addition. The infamous fourth plinth which has seen the like of a giant blue cock (the chicken of course), a hotel model, a pregnant torso, and a giant ship in a bottle has remained predominantly empty following William IV’s failed attempts to erect a statue of himself. Following the Fourth Plinth Project, (1998-2001) in 2003 the plinth was officially transferred from Westminster City Council to the Mayor of London giving birth to...

read more

An Interactive Afternoon at The Hepworth Wakefield

More than any other art form, sculpture engages and confronts us directly. We are obliged, in a way we are not with wall-based 2D work, to share our own space with it; we have to move around it, look over, through or into it. And since we negotiate an object-based physical world every day, we are already primed for the bodily experience of sculpture. Simon Wallis, 22/10/2016 I never tire of the interactive nature of sculpture. I love the opportunity artists take to use any materials to create their pieces, from everyday objects to marble, and...

read more

Mailing List

Advert




Recommended